Quick Answer: Can minoxidil cause facial hair growth?

Some women may experience facial hair growth when they use minoxidil. That can happen if the medication trickles down onto your face or simply as a side effect when you apply it only to your scalp.

Does Oral minoxidil cause facial hair growth?

This medicine causes a temporary increase in hair growth in most people. Hair may grow longer and darker in both men and women. This may first be noticed on the face several weeks after you start taking minoxidil.

Does minoxidil cause body hair growth?

This is completely normal. When taking Minoxidil, you may also see hair growth occur on different parts of your body, too. Most commonly, your facial hair may grow more than usual — but you can see increased body hair growth elsewhere at the same time. This is the result of the Minoxidil in your bloodstream.

Does minoxidil ruin your face?

There is currently a great buzz on the internet world that topical minoxidil affects collagen synthesis and affects facial skin by promoting facial aging. … As for affecting collagen synthesis – minoxidil probably DOES affect collagen synthesis in the scalp.

What happens if you stop minoxidil?

What happens if you stop minoxidil? If you stop applying minoxidil to your scalp, you’ll gradually lose any hair that you’ve regrown as a result of the medication. Minoxidil is a well-studied medication that’s safe to use for the long term.

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Why minoxidil is bad?

Minoxidil can cause salt and water to build up in your body. This can lead to congestive heart failure. Your doctor should prescribe that you take a diuretic with minoxidil to help prevent this.

Why does minoxidil cause facial hair?

Some women may experience facial hair growth when they use minoxidil. That can happen if the medication trickles down onto your face or simply as a side effect when you apply it only to your scalp.

What are the negative effects of minoxidil?

Side Effects

  • Acne at site of application.
  • burning of scalp.
  • facial hair growth.
  • increased hair loss.
  • inflammation or soreness at root of hair.
  • reddened skin.
  • swelling of face.

Who should not use minoxidil?

Individuals younger than 18 years old should not use minoxidil products like Rogaine. Elderly individuals who use minoxidil may experience increased sensitivity to cold temperatures. Minoxidil topical solution should present a low-risk factor to breastfeeding infants.

Is there an alternative to minoxidil?

Are There Over-the-Counter Alternatives to Minoxidil? As it currently stands, Rogaine (minoxidil) and Propecia (finasteride) are the only hair loss treatments approved by the FDA. Unlike minoxidil, finasteride works by inhibiting 5AR. As a result, less DHT is produced.

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